HDV Translational Science

Globally, over 40 million people are infected with the Hepatitis Delta virus (HDV). In the US, there is an alarming trend in the rise of infections. Hepatitis D remains a serious challenge for three reasons. First, there is no FDA approved therapy, and the current treatment with interferon-alpha has a very low success rate (<25%). It is the most aggressive form of viral hepatitis and results in accelerated liver-related deaths and hepatocellular carcinoma (a common form of liver cancer). Lastly,...

Globally, over 40 million people are infected with the Hepatitis Delta virus (HDV). In the US, there is an alarming trend in the rise of infections. Hepatitis D remains a serious challenge for three reasons. First, there is no FDA approved therapy, and the current treatment with interferon-alpha has a very low success rate (<25%). It is the most aggressive form of viral hepatitis and results in accelerated liver-related deaths and hepatocellular carcinoma (a common form of liver cancer). Lastly, there are limited cell-culture and animal models to study the virus in order to test new antivirals.