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Loyola University Medical Center

Department of Medicine

Division of Hepatology

2160 S. First Ave
Mulcahy Center, Rm 1610

Maywood, IL 60153, USA

Email: hdahari@luc.edu

Phone: 708-216-4682

Fax: 708-216-6299

High-Risk Geographic Mobility Patterns among Young Urban and Suburban Persons who Inject Drugs and their Injection Networks Members

J Urban Health

 February 2018

[Full TextPubmed]

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Young people in the USA who inject drugs, particularly those at a risk of residence instability, experience the highest incidence of hepatitis C (HCV) infections. This study examined associations between geographic mobility patterns and sociodemographic, behavioral, and social network characteristics of 164 young (ages 18-30) persons who inject drugs (PWID). 

METHODS:

We identified a potential bridge sub-population who reported residence in both urban and suburban areas in the past year (crossover transients) and higher-risk behaviors (receptive syringe sharing, multiple sex partners) compared to their residentially localized counterparts. 

RESULTS:

Because they link suburban and urban networks, crossover transients may facilitate transmission of HIV and HCV between higher and lower prevalence areas.

CONCLUSIONS:

Interventions should address risk associated with residential instability, particularly among PWID who travel between urban and suburban areas.

Boodram B, Hotton AL, Shekhtman L, Gutfraind A, Dahari H